Ramblings of a Railfan

Mostly Ferroequinology, among other things

Posts tagged Steam engine

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A GWR Castle at speed - 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe racing alongside the M5

GWR Castle Class No. 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe races alongside the M5 motorway in Devon with the returning Cornishman railtour which ran from Bristol to Plymouth and back. 28th April 2012

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Oldham…

Available on Mainline Diary 2012: Part 1, available from July 2012

Mmmm…. lovely!

Filed under Earl of Mount Edgecumbe Great Western Railway steam locomotive Steam Train Railway Railroad locomotive Steam Engine GWR Castle

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Image 301. 720 Class. No 729. Yantaringa. 8.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 301 720 Class. No 729. Bridgewater / Yantaringa. 8.4.1950. The 720 Class Locomotive was built at the SAR Islington Workshops and were updated versions of earlier 700 and 710 class ‘Mikado’s’. From 1930 until 1943 the Islington Workshops would build 17 locomotives designated 720 class. These powerful impressive looking engines were capable of hauling loads of up to 1,600 tons and stayed in service until being replaced by the first main line diesel electrics around 1960. Number 729 commenced working on 16.5.1939, withdrawn from service in 1958 and cut up for scrap in March 1960 after covering 440,715 miles.

Image 301. 720 Class. No 729. Yantaringa. 8.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 301
720 Class. No 729. Bridgewater / Yantaringa. 8.4.1950.
The 720 Class Locomotive was built at the SAR Islington Workshops and were updated versions of earlier 700 and 710 class ‘Mikado’s’.
From 1930 until 1943 the Islington Workshops would build 17 locomotives designated 720 class. These powerful impressive looking engines were capable of hauling loads of up to 1,600 tons and stayed in service until being replaced by the first main line diesel electrics around 1960.
Number 729 commenced working on 16.5.1939, withdrawn from service in 1958 and cut up for scrap in March 1960 after covering 440,715 miles.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam locomotive steam engine train railway

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Image 285. 710 Class. No 714. Yantaringa c1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 285 710 Class. Number 714. Near Yantaringa. c1950. Power Engine at work. Following the success of the ten imported ‘Big Power’ 700 Class locos from Great Britain, the South Australian Railways commissioned the building of a further ten at their workshops at Islington, SA. Commonly known as the Mikado Type locomotive the newly built engines were designated 710 Class and varied only by a few modifications. At times the big power engine had been used on passenger runs, however, their primary duty was to haul goods, especially useful on long trains of grain and would travel many secondary lines to destinations such as, Willunga, Renmark, Mount Pleasant, Pinnaroo, Robertstown, Morgan, Gladstone and the Yorke Peninsula. They were superseded by the Diesel Electrics and were largely withdrawn from service in the mid 1960s. Given the name: Rotarian, number 714 was placed into service on 15 March 1929. After a working life covering 653,847 miles it was cut up at Mile End. 25.11.1964.

Image 285. 710 Class. No 714. Yantaringa c1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 285
710 Class. Number 714. Near Yantaringa. c1950. Power Engine at work.
Following the success of the ten imported ‘Big Power’ 700 Class locos from Great Britain, the South Australian Railways commissioned the building of a further ten at their workshops at Islington, SA. Commonly known as the Mikado Type locomotive the newly built engines were designated 710 Class and varied only by a few modifications.
At times the big power engine had been used on passenger runs, however, their primary duty was to haul goods, especially useful on long trains of grain and would travel many secondary lines to destinations such as, Willunga, Renmark, Mount Pleasant, Pinnaroo, Robertstown, Morgan, Gladstone and the Yorke Peninsula. They were superseded by the Diesel Electrics and were largely withdrawn from service in the mid 1960s.
Given the name: Rotarian, number 714 was placed into service on 15 March 1929. After a working life covering 653,847 miles it was cut up at Mile End. 25.11.1964.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam engine train railway Steam locomotive

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Image 291. S Class. No 134. Mile End 21.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 291 S Class. No 134. Mile End, SA. 21.4.1950. The S Class locomotive used by the SAR was designed for express passenger duties. The 6’6” driving wheels were the largest of any engine in regular service in Australia and were well suited for their designated work. During their working life they would see service on sections of the Melbourne and Broken Hill Express, later hauling passenger trains to Moonta, Victor Harbour, Willunga, Morgan, Snowtown, Robertstown and Spalding. From 1894 until 1904 James Martin & Company of Gawler, South Australia, manufactured 18 of these handsome 82 ton engines.  Number 134 entered service on 14 Nov 1894. After redundancy due to diesel it was condemned in 1956 and cut up for scrap at Islington workshops in September 1961.

Image 291. S Class. No 134. Mile End 21.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 291
S Class. No 134. Mile End, SA. 21.4.1950.
The S Class locomotive used by the SAR was designed for express passenger duties. The 6’6” driving wheels were the largest of any engine in regular service in Australia and were well suited for their designated work. During their working life they would see service on sections of the Melbourne and Broken Hill Express, later hauling passenger trains to Moonta, Victor Harbour, Willunga, Morgan, Snowtown, Robertstown and Spalding. From 1894 until 1904 James Martin & Company of Gawler, South Australia, manufactured 18 of these handsome 82 ton engines.
Number 134 entered service on 14 Nov 1894.
After redundancy due to diesel it was condemned in 1956 and cut up for scrap at Islington workshops in September 1961.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam locomotive steam engine train railway

7 notes

Image 295. 600 Class. Number 600. Tailem Bend 1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 295 600 Class. Number 600. Class Leader. Tailem Bend, SA. 12.8.1950 The ten ‘Pacific’ type locomotives of the 600 Class were purchased from builder Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth of Newcastle on Tyne, England, in 1926. They worked on broad gauge lines hauling both passenger express and freight trains. They were introduced to take the previous work of the smaller S and Q class locomotives which were often double-headed on heavier trains. Number 600 was introduced to service on 14 August 1926 and after a magnificent working life having covered 1,512,812 miles was cut up for scrap at Islington in 1961. The permissible speed of these handsome ‘Pacifics’ were set at 60 m.p.h. Many enginemen felt the 600’s full power potential speed was never realised during their working life.

Image 295. 600 Class. Number 600. Tailem Bend 1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 295
600 Class. Number 600. Class Leader. Tailem Bend, SA. 12.8.1950
The ten ‘Pacific’ type locomotives of the 600 Class were purchased from builder Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth of Newcastle on Tyne, England, in 1926. They worked on broad gauge lines hauling both passenger express and freight trains. They were introduced to take the previous work of the smaller S and Q class locomotives which were often double-headed on heavier trains.
Number 600 was introduced to service on 14 August 1926 and after a magnificent working life having covered 1,512,812 miles was cut up for scrap at Islington in 1961.
The permissible speed of these handsome ‘Pacifics’ were set at 60 m.p.h.
Many enginemen felt the 600’s full power potential speed was never realised during their working life.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam locomotive railway train steam engine