Ramblings of a Railfan

Mostly Ferroequinology, among other things

Posts tagged railway

3 notes

zeether asked: What's your favorite Japanese train? I'm sort of a fan of the Hankyu Railway's rolling stock myself.

Regarding Steam:

I’m heavily drawn towards Japanese Steam. There’s something about those running boards, combination steam/sand domes, electric headlamps, and smoke deflectors that really comes out in them. It’s all very straight forward and pragmatic (in the best way possible). Their express passenger locomotives are some of the most graceful things I can think of and their C10/11/12 Tanks are very handsome looking engines.

Plus, the shared design of the C56 and the C11 (or was it C12) is pretty analogous to the DRG Class 24/64 design or the Ivatt 2MT 2-6-2t/2-6-0 design. Very clever designing two locomotives at once…

Regarding Electrics:

The Hankyu Railway has a fantastic red-brown colour scheme that looks fantastic on their older EMUs (like the 600, 610, and 710 classes) which reminds me of Interurbans here in the States. Plus, it’s a standard gauge (4’-8.5”) railway too. 

I like the Enoshima Electric Railway (Enoden)’s equipment as well. They have a compact feel to them. Add that with street running and a seaside line and you’ve got some good stuff going on. Type 10s are really elegant looking and while they are very much a modern EMU, they do the retro look really well.

Also there’s something about 3rd rail-powered EMUs that I feel works with the Japanese EMU design.

I haven’t found a Japanese Electric locomotive (i.e. non-EMU electric) I dislike yet. They’re all very handsome locomotives. I’d take a single headlight unit over a double headlight unit, though.

Regarding Diesels:

Not so much a diesel guy, but I like the DD51 and the DD16 classes. Very straight and too the point. I feel as though Japan brought the center cab locomotives to a very good point.

I like the class DE10 simply for that odd wheel arrangement and the fact that it’s a Diesel-Hydraulic.

I like the look of the DF200s, but I’m just not a fan of any of the liveries they wear. A plain black with minimal lining might suit them better, IMO…

~~~

Hope this answers your question!

Filed under zeether japan steam locomotives steam trains steam engines electric train Electric locomotive electric multiple unit diesel engine diesel locomotive diesel train railway railroad Japanese Steam japanese railways

7 notes

A GWR Castle at speed - 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe racing alongside the M5

GWR Castle Class No. 5043 Earl of Mount Edgcumbe races alongside the M5 motorway in Devon with the returning Cornishman railtour which ran from Bristol to Plymouth and back. 28th April 2012

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Oldham…

Available on Mainline Diary 2012: Part 1, available from July 2012

Mmmm…. lovely!

Filed under Earl of Mount Edgecumbe Great Western Railway steam locomotive Steam Train Railway Railroad locomotive Steam Engine GWR Castle

7 notes

Image 301. 720 Class. No 729. Yantaringa. 8.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 301 720 Class. No 729. Bridgewater / Yantaringa. 8.4.1950. The 720 Class Locomotive was built at the SAR Islington Workshops and were updated versions of earlier 700 and 710 class ‘Mikado’s’. From 1930 until 1943 the Islington Workshops would build 17 locomotives designated 720 class. These powerful impressive looking engines were capable of hauling loads of up to 1,600 tons and stayed in service until being replaced by the first main line diesel electrics around 1960. Number 729 commenced working on 16.5.1939, withdrawn from service in 1958 and cut up for scrap in March 1960 after covering 440,715 miles.

Image 301. 720 Class. No 729. Yantaringa. 8.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 301
720 Class. No 729. Bridgewater / Yantaringa. 8.4.1950.
The 720 Class Locomotive was built at the SAR Islington Workshops and were updated versions of earlier 700 and 710 class ‘Mikado’s’.
From 1930 until 1943 the Islington Workshops would build 17 locomotives designated 720 class. These powerful impressive looking engines were capable of hauling loads of up to 1,600 tons and stayed in service until being replaced by the first main line diesel electrics around 1960.
Number 729 commenced working on 16.5.1939, withdrawn from service in 1958 and cut up for scrap in March 1960 after covering 440,715 miles.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam locomotive steam engine train railway

3 notes

Image 285. 710 Class. No 714. Yantaringa c1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 285 710 Class. Number 714. Near Yantaringa. c1950. Power Engine at work. Following the success of the ten imported ‘Big Power’ 700 Class locos from Great Britain, the South Australian Railways commissioned the building of a further ten at their workshops at Islington, SA. Commonly known as the Mikado Type locomotive the newly built engines were designated 710 Class and varied only by a few modifications. At times the big power engine had been used on passenger runs, however, their primary duty was to haul goods, especially useful on long trains of grain and would travel many secondary lines to destinations such as, Willunga, Renmark, Mount Pleasant, Pinnaroo, Robertstown, Morgan, Gladstone and the Yorke Peninsula. They were superseded by the Diesel Electrics and were largely withdrawn from service in the mid 1960s. Given the name: Rotarian, number 714 was placed into service on 15 March 1929. After a working life covering 653,847 miles it was cut up at Mile End. 25.11.1964.

Image 285. 710 Class. No 714. Yantaringa c1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 285
710 Class. Number 714. Near Yantaringa. c1950. Power Engine at work.
Following the success of the ten imported ‘Big Power’ 700 Class locos from Great Britain, the South Australian Railways commissioned the building of a further ten at their workshops at Islington, SA. Commonly known as the Mikado Type locomotive the newly built engines were designated 710 Class and varied only by a few modifications.
At times the big power engine had been used on passenger runs, however, their primary duty was to haul goods, especially useful on long trains of grain and would travel many secondary lines to destinations such as, Willunga, Renmark, Mount Pleasant, Pinnaroo, Robertstown, Morgan, Gladstone and the Yorke Peninsula. They were superseded by the Diesel Electrics and were largely withdrawn from service in the mid 1960s.
Given the name: Rotarian, number 714 was placed into service on 15 March 1929. After a working life covering 653,847 miles it was cut up at Mile End. 25.11.1964.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam engine train railway Steam locomotive

6 notes

Steam locomotive and carriages, [South Australia, n.d.] by Cultural Collections, University of Newcastle on Flickr.

Via Flickr: This image was scanned from an original glass plate or negative, kindly provided by the Australian Railway Historical Society, New South Wales Division. This image can be used for study and personal research purposes. If you wish to reproduce this image for any other purpose you must obtain permission by contacting the University of Newcastle’s Cultural Collections.  If you have any further information about the image, please contact us or leave a comment in the box below.

Steam locomotive and carriages, [South Australia, n.d.] by Cultural Collections, University of Newcastle on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
This image was scanned from an original glass plate or negative, kindly provided by the Australian Railway Historical Society, New South Wales Division.

This image can be used for study and personal research purposes. If you wish to reproduce this image for any other purpose you must obtain permission by contacting the University of Newcastle’s Cultural Collections.

If you have any further information about the image, please contact us or leave a comment in the box below.

Filed under CRHSN0077_B4 Australian Railway Historical Society railroads carriages South Australia Train Australian Railway Historical Society ARHS NSW ARHS NSW Steam train

4 notes

Image 291. S Class. No 134. Mile End 21.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 291 S Class. No 134. Mile End, SA. 21.4.1950. The S Class locomotive used by the SAR was designed for express passenger duties. The 6’6” driving wheels were the largest of any engine in regular service in Australia and were well suited for their designated work. During their working life they would see service on sections of the Melbourne and Broken Hill Express, later hauling passenger trains to Moonta, Victor Harbour, Willunga, Morgan, Snowtown, Robertstown and Spalding. From 1894 until 1904 James Martin & Company of Gawler, South Australia, manufactured 18 of these handsome 82 ton engines.  Number 134 entered service on 14 Nov 1894. After redundancy due to diesel it was condemned in 1956 and cut up for scrap at Islington workshops in September 1961.

Image 291. S Class. No 134. Mile End 21.4.1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 291
S Class. No 134. Mile End, SA. 21.4.1950.
The S Class locomotive used by the SAR was designed for express passenger duties. The 6’6” driving wheels were the largest of any engine in regular service in Australia and were well suited for their designated work. During their working life they would see service on sections of the Melbourne and Broken Hill Express, later hauling passenger trains to Moonta, Victor Harbour, Willunga, Morgan, Snowtown, Robertstown and Spalding. From 1894 until 1904 James Martin & Company of Gawler, South Australia, manufactured 18 of these handsome 82 ton engines.
Number 134 entered service on 14 Nov 1894.
After redundancy due to diesel it was condemned in 1956 and cut up for scrap at Islington workshops in September 1961.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam locomotive steam engine train railway

7 notes

Image 295. 600 Class. Number 600. Tailem Bend 1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr: Image 295 600 Class. Number 600. Class Leader. Tailem Bend, SA. 12.8.1950 The ten ‘Pacific’ type locomotives of the 600 Class were purchased from builder Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth of Newcastle on Tyne, England, in 1926. They worked on broad gauge lines hauling both passenger express and freight trains. They were introduced to take the previous work of the smaller S and Q class locomotives which were often double-headed on heavier trains. Number 600 was introduced to service on 14 August 1926 and after a magnificent working life having covered 1,512,812 miles was cut up for scrap at Islington in 1961. The permissible speed of these handsome ‘Pacifics’ were set at 60 m.p.h. Many enginemen felt the 600’s full power potential speed was never realised during their working life.

Image 295. 600 Class. Number 600. Tailem Bend 1950 by All About South Australia. on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Image 295
600 Class. Number 600. Class Leader. Tailem Bend, SA. 12.8.1950
The ten ‘Pacific’ type locomotives of the 600 Class were purchased from builder Sir W.G. Armstrong Whitworth of Newcastle on Tyne, England, in 1926. They worked on broad gauge lines hauling both passenger express and freight trains. They were introduced to take the previous work of the smaller S and Q class locomotives which were often double-headed on heavier trains.
Number 600 was introduced to service on 14 August 1926 and after a magnificent working life having covered 1,512,812 miles was cut up for scrap at Islington in 1961.
The permissible speed of these handsome ‘Pacifics’ were set at 60 m.p.h.
Many enginemen felt the 600’s full power potential speed was never realised during their working life.

Filed under South Australian Railways steam locomotive railway train steam engine

1 note

wings-and-strings asked: Hey, just curious... what was the largest steam locomotive in Britain? I've been looking online and can't find a definitive statement like I can for the 4-8-8-4 in the states. I'm guessing a 2-10-0 or Garrett type?

Britain never had any Mallet locomotives on the mainline to my knowledge, loading gauge and all that jazz. To my knowlege, the only mallet that has run in Britain is the Statfold Barn Railway’s O&K and Junk Mallets. In terms of non-articulated locomotives, the largest was probably the BR Standard Class 9F, but I could be wrong about that.

Now, the largest steam locomotive in Great Britain was most likely the LNER U1 class, which consisted of a one-off 2-8-0+0-8-2 Beyer-Garratt. That was withdrawn and scrapped in 1955-56. 

Large engines like the U1 were very rare on UK metals. They didn’t have the need for massive locomotives like we did here in The States. Grades aren’t as steep and distances are relatively short. Something like the UP’s 4000 and 3900 classes would be considered overkill.

Filed under wings-and-strings british steam LNER Steam locomotive railway